Nigel Munisamy

Migration is not a problem in itself but forced migration certainly is. It is urgent to find a solution not only for its victims but also as a response to its use as the dog whistle of the extreme-right. All the humanitarian aid we send and all the measures of Fortress Europe will not tackle [...]

Migration is not a problem in itself but forced migration certainly is. It is urgent to find a solution not only for its victims but also as a response to its use as the dog whistle of the extreme-right. All the humanitarian aid we send and all the measures of Fortress Europe will not tackle the enormity of the situation. Only action taken in the countries at the source will solve it both for us here in Europe and for those forced to flee their homes for whatever reason.

Son of a British Empire migrant I am British by birth and now, after 42 years of residence and work travelling in Europe and the world with the Orchestre Royal Philharmonique de Liège, a Belgian citizen as well. My children now live outside Belgium so migration in one form or another is part of my life. The ongoing shock of Brexit made me realise that if nothing changes in the way that the European Union is managed, it may well not survive. When I learnt of and started to read Yanis Varoufakis and realised that a London trained Greek economist had not only founded a political movement ,DiEM25 but, despite the experience of his country, saw the value of continuing with the EU, I joined immediately. I hope that the weight of years and my background has given me some insight into the workings of Europe.